2021 NJMEA Virtual Conference Schedule

Reminder: All sessions will be recorded and remain available on the conference website until the end of the school year. Last Updated: January 29, 2021

Thursday, February 18, 2021

Session 1 (12:00 – 1:00 PM)

Five Ways for Students to be Creative with MusicFirst

Clinician: Robin Hodson

Session Description

Want to engage your students will creative music-making? Then join us for this exciting session which will review five powerful software tools made for student engagement with sequencing, audio editing, composition, beat-making, podcasting, loops, recording, and more! We’ll review best practices and simple tricks and tips for getting students engaged with music-making using Noteflight Learn, Flat for Education, Soundtrap for Education, and Soundation4Education.

Unlock the Power of Your Low Strings

Clinician: David Eccles

Session Description

The rhythmic and harmonic power of the string section resides in the cellos and basses. This session will explore everything low string related. From strings, to bows, to fingerings, the major technical and pedagogical approaches will be discussed.

Tech for the Music Educator – “Not Another App Presentation”

Clinician: Derek Rohaly

Session Description

Too often music educators are pushed to use technology because it is a requirement on a teacher evaluation form. Technology should help make teachers’ jobs easier, not more complicated. This session will demonstrate that it is possible to use technology in a meaningful way for you and your students. This session will be a walkthrough of practical technology applications to use in your classrooms today from utility programs/apps, reinventing how we think of forms, easy photo and video editors, communication tools, and more!

The Interactive General Music Classroom

Clinician: Shawna Longo

Session Description

Have you ever found yourself wondering – with so many resources out there, where do I begin? This workshop will present practical teaching examples and best practices in using interactive content and resources in your classroom and through distance learning. Expand your curriculum and your student’s engagement with and excitement for music using these tried and true tips and tricks for integration and organization. All elementary general music curriculum materials presented in this session have been tested and are used frequently by the presenter to further engage her students.

Session 2 (1:15 – 2:15 PM)

Meaningful Assessment with Technology

Clinician: John Mlynczak

Session Description

Assessment in education is valuable when part of a constant cycle of positive feedback and growth. Technology allows for instant peer collaboration, which is essential for growth. This session will demonstrate several models for assessing musical growth in a positive and meaningful way and how to communicate with students on any device, anywhere.

Remote Music Responding Activities Based on Social Emotional Learning (SEL): Elementary

Clinician: Sangmi Kang
Co-Presenter: Devon Barnes, Leigh Huber, Sam Scheibe, Kelly Zuzic

Session Description

During this pandemic, the teaching modality has drastically changed, and remote teaching has become an alternative but default mode of teaching. Among many educational aims, teachers are concerned whether such virtual learning experiences could meet students’ social and emotional needs. Music is inherently a viable subject in addressing these needs, but different strategies are required if it is taught remotely. This session is designed to explore methods of fostering students’ social and emotional learning in remote music teaching. These responding activities will be used as emotional stimuli to bring self-awareness and social awareness to students (Zins et al., 2004). Such self- and social-awarenesses will lead to responsible decision-making, self-management, and relationship management (Gardner, 1983; Zins et al., 2004). The lessons will broadly follow the sequence of (a) understanding the context of music, (b) exposure to musical sounds, (c) an engaged listening activity, and an SEL activity (Edgar, 2013; Campbell & Scott-Kassner, 2018). In a synchronous teaching setting, the engaged listening activities and the SEL activities can be implemented in a small break-out room setting.

  1. Understanding the Context of Music: To use music as a means of fostering self- and social awareness, it is crucial to understand the context of music. Teachers can encourage students to investigate the genre, lyrics, composer, and background of the music, and thus prepare students to fully receive the music (Campbell & Scott-Kassner, 2018). This is a preparatory stage to have students set expectations for the upcoming listening experience. Often such musical context further elicits students’ emotions towards the musical stimuli. In a synchronous setting, students can obtain this context by communicating with classmates.
  2. Exposure to Musical Sounds: In this stage, students will listen to music. Teachers will encourage them to listen and express their emotions about what they hear. If the listening repertoire is taken from music theater genres (such as musicals or operas), teachers should let the students pick one character they wish to relate to. When listening again, teachers may have the students express their feelings about the music. This is a good strategy to expand students’ responses to music beyond “happy” and “sad” by inviting them to consider various dimensions of a musical piece (Edgar, 2013).
  3. Engaged Listening Activities: Next, students will actively express their emotions while listening to music. Such partial participation while listening to music has been labeled “engaged listening” (Campbell & Scott-Kassner, 2018). Listeners participate in “some extent of music-making while the recorded (or live) music is sounding” (p. 92). Possible ideas for this include humming/singing a melody, patting/clapping a distinctive rhythm phrase, playing a percussion part/an ostinato/a melodic phrase, or moving eurhythmically. Students can decide the type and level of activity to express their feelings (Green, 2008).
  4. SEL Activities: In this stage, students move on to the next stage of engaged listening, “student-centered” expressivity. The question in this stage will be “what would you do if…” for example, if you were the composer of this music, if you were the audience of this music, if you were a certain character of this music theater piece, which social and emotional decisions would you make? Students’ responses can be conveyed by story-telling, simple songwriting, creating noises, etc. Edgar (2003) suggested that improvisation, ensemble playing/singing, and identifying emotions in music are musical activities that address social emotional learning.

We will be using an elementary musical for our exemplary responding activities, “Extra Ordinarily Chicken” (by Huber, Scafuto, and Zuzic). The story delineates an ordinary chicken’s journey to find his true self, and in the process the chicken and his animal friends mutually help each other find who they are and form a learning community. The musical effects dynamically support the story, so students will explore their emotional and social needs in a variety of angles. The music can be found in this link (https://youtu.be/JCE3nBoNQRQ). We have provided an example of a lesson plan as a supporting document. Utilizing this musical piece as an example, music teachers can find further adequate resources for remote social emotional learning. Social emotional learning addresses “students’ social competency training, positive youth development, violence prevention, character education, and mental health prevention (Edgar, 2003, p. 29). This responding lesson is a great example of a way to achieve such an outcome in a remote music teaching setting, either synchronously or asynchronously.

Get Your Students to Compose in the Cloud with SmartMusic

Clinician: Kevin Mead

Session Description

SmartMusic is known for helping teachers and students with accompaniment and assessment. Now entirely cloud-based and with a composition tool called Compose and its newest functionality, SmartMusic provides the opportunity for students to write, share, and practice their music on nearly any device. Enhance your students’ musical routine with SmartMusic. Learner outcomes:

  • Attendees will understand how to access the composition tool inside SmartMusic
  • Attendees will experience the capabilities of the web-based composition tool for writing music
  • Attendees will learn how to share and manage shared music

Plans for participant involvement:

  • Participants will see how music can be composed with the Compose tool in SmartMusic
  • Participants will be able to hear the music composed
  • Participants will be able to ask questions

Stay Gold: Five Core Tenets for Building a Choral Program

Clinician: Dr. Eric Posada

Session Description

Leading a program is much more than pitches, rhythms, and sweepstakes trophies. Just as important is human interaction, motivation, and innovation. Music educators must find ways to motivate their students daily, monthly, and annually while staying true to themselves. The task is not to force or coerce performance but to create an environment in which musicians feel loved, appreciated, and safe allowing their potential to be maximized. This, however, is impossible to achieve without a tangible, unwavering philosophy. Dr. Posada has led choirs at the elementary, middle school, high school, two-year college, university, community, church, and professional levels. He will address topics that include articulating a clear philosophy, building a program centered around core values, creating innovative themed rehearsals, participating in meaningful bonding activities, learning each learner, selecting engaging and meaningful repertoire, and maximizing potential via positivity and love.

Caruso Approach for Brass Musicians

Clinician: Dr. Joseph Montelione

Session Description

I will present a clinic about how to improve a brass musician’s technique using concepts taught by Carmine Caruso and William Vacchiano. The underlying reason for this approach to playing a brass instrument is to bring all the muscles in the face (and respiratory system) into a high degree of consistency in balance and synchronization when being utilized for sound production on a brass instrument. This will result in the player achieving an extreme ease of execution on the horn for most of the physical demands found in music. That in turn will result in the player being able to focus his or her attention on the musical conception inherent in the music he or she is playing and not have to worry about whether he or she will make the notes or tire before the end of the piece. This will lead a player to become a confident and expressive musician. The Caruso approach can apply to any level musician as it is designed to only deal with the physical aspect of playing a brass instrument. Outline

  • Intro of Caruso Method
  • Understand the basic principles that include
    • Coordination
    • Synchronization
    • Condition Reflex
    • Second Nature
    • Extension of our self
  • Have students get instruments out
  • Go through each exercise with the class
  • Recap

PERFORMANCE

Clinician: Mantra Youth Percussion
Director: Joe Bergen

Session 3 (2:30 – 3:30 PM)

Tech Tools for Sight Reading and Performance Assessment

Clinician: Dr. Jim Frankel

Session Description

Accuracy is essential for your students’ success. You want to help them improve their sight reading accuracy, and you also need to be able to reliably and accurate assess their performance proficiency. Discover software tools that will build these skills through aural training and increasingly rigorous exercises, as well as automated assessment to help you target problem areas and increase your ensemble’s confidence with new repertoire. Software featured: Sight Reading Factory, PracticeFirst, Noteflight Learn with SoundCheck, and MusicFirst Classroom.

Air On a G Suite: Google tools for music education

Clinician: John Mlynczak

Session Description

Google Suite for Education provides a range of tools that can be used by music educators to create more creative and productive classrooms. Using these resources allows students to efficiently and effectively learn in a collaborative environment while gaining valuable career skills. This session will provide an overview of essential Google tools for music, present applications in the music classroom, and introduce integrated music software.

Equip Your Choir with Tools for Music Literacy

Clinician: Emily Crocker

Session Description

You Think Sight-Reading, They Think FUN! FUN for the teacher, too! Follow a prescribed sequence and see the reading (and fun!) develop. This session includes techniques and materials to introduce and develop music reading skills in beginning middle school choirs. A packet with handout and sample materials included.

Digital and Blended Learning Strategies for Modern Band

Clinician: Bryan Powell

Session Description

This session will identify and demonstrate how teachers can use the most engaging, comprehensive, and interactive music tools found online to reach students of all levels during any time. As a new-found part of today’s education, participants will become aware of how to make distance/remote learning beneficial to everyone.

Remote Instruction In And Out Of The Recorder Classroom

Clinician: Rina Sklar

Session Description

The Covid-19 pandemic has disrupted classroom learning in a profound and unprecedented way. Moving forward, music teachers must be prepared to teach in a traditional classroom setting, remotely from home or a possible hybrid of classroom and distance learning. The ability to teach in the different settings is probably the most pressing issue confronting all music educators. This session will help teachers adapt to the new normal so that they may effectively teach recorder regardless of the teaching situation. An online, interactive recorder curriculum will be discussed and ideas for recorder instruction videos will be explored. This session presents ideas for combining traditional classroom teaching techniques with the use of digital learning outside of the classroom. Implementing suggestions for encouraging students to be proactive and take more responsibility for the learning process will become increasingly necessary if physical classroom contact is limited. Rina will discuss teaching techniques that may be immediately implemented for structuring interaction with students as well as well as formulating expectations for distance participation. This session will introduce the platform, Flipgrid, which enables teachers and students to easily exchange videos. The use of Flipgrid enhances teachers’ communication and engagement with their students and provides an easily used channel of communication. Using different platforms to make things interesting and motivating will be discussed. Concerns regarding student privacy will also be addressed.

Technology to Support Elementary Music

Clinician: Shawna Longo

Session Description

Are you looking for practical and simple ideas for tech-based instruction through distance learning? Are you looking for new ideas to update your elementary music classes? Thinking about including more technology? In this session, we will explore numerous free and inexpensive ways to bring more technology into your music classes. The following questions related to distance learning will also be answered:

  • What types of projects did you do?
  • What tools did you find most useful? (Software, hardware, resources, etc.)
  • What worked? What didn’t work?
  • What are your plans for the fall for blended/virtual learning?
  • How did technology help?
  • Tips and Tricks for virtual classroom management

Outline:

  • MusicFirst Jr.
  • Essential Elements for Music
  • FlipGrid
  • Padlet
  • WooClap
  • Chrome Music Lab
  • Google Creatability Experiments
  • TeachRock Distance Learning Packs
  • Choice Cards, Interactive Classrooms, Activity Cards w/ Google Slides & Canva
  • Curricular Planning for Tech
  • Budgeting for Tech
  • Resources

Exhibits (3:45 – 4:45 PM)

Session 4 (4:30 – 5:30 PM)

Rhythm- The First “R”

Clinician: John Gronert

Session Description

One of the biggest challenges facing all music educators is developing strong music reading skills. Teaching music reading skills requires different strategies and approaches depending upon the age and experience of your students. As a recorder teacher, band director and marimba group instructor, John brings a unique perspective that you will enjoy. John will present number systems, word rhythms and syllable systems suitable for use with your younger students. He will also demonstrate a step-by-step approach for establishing rhythm reading accuracy and improving sight reading skills that is effective for your students’ continued music reading development. His innovative, practical techniques will provide you with effective ideas you will immediately be able to use with your students.

80 Strings, 2 Hands: Teaching techniques for group ukulele instruction.

Clinician: Ian White
Co-Presenter: Ian White

Session Description

The bell rings, it’s 9:00am, an excited group of 20 fifth graders file into your music classroom. You hear some chatter about today being the big day…the day we get to play the ukulele! You welcome your students and spring into action with a well-prepared lesson and a plan for managing behavior and equipment. The class runs smoothly, you are smiling, the students are happily learning their first skill. There is a high level of engagement and enthusiasm throughout the class. The class comes to an end, your charges file out and you hear some chatter about how much fun ukulele is, and how they can’t wait for music class next week. The classroom is quiet, your ukuleles are put away correctly, you exhale and smile knowing that the lesson was successful. That excitement and anticipation on day one is an extremely valuable resource to a teacher. Without a detailed plan, the students’ excitement could dissipate as boredom or frustration seeps into the room. This session covers what to do on day 1 and beyond. As a result of this session teachers will know what skills to teach, when and most importantly how to teach those skills. Music teachers with little or no ukulele experience will be able to teach ukulele in their general music classroom as a result of this session. Below are the topics I will address.

  • Classroom Management – procedures and rules to make the classroom ukulele experience flow smoothly from set-up to clean-up.
  • Instructional Techniques – How to teach ukulele skills such as fretting chords and melodic playing to a group of students.
  • Instructional Sequence – A sequence for teaching ukulele that is designed to provide students with small victories from day one. Ideas for teaching the most basic ukulele skills in a rigorous and musical way.
  • Instructional Aides – Methods of modifying ukuleles to help students quickly grasp concepts such as fretting chords.
  • Differentiation – Methods for helping all types of learners benefit from ukulele instruction.
  • Troubleshooting- A review of the most common pitfalls and ways to correct them.
  • Equipment Management – Tips for tuning and maintaining your fleet of ukes.
  • What To Purchase – What brands/models of ukes are best for the classroom. What accessories and supplies to purchase.
  • Resources – What resources are available online and in print for enhancing your ukulele curriculum.

Smart Music: One Great Tool for All Your Teaching in the Cloud

Clinician: Kevin Mead

Session Description

SmartMusic is known for helping teachers with accompaniment and assessment. Now entirely cloud-based, SmartMusic includes tools like Sight Reading Builder and Compose so teachers always have the right tool for the job. This clinic explores all of SmartMusic so you can become familiar with it and unleash your students’ potential. Learner Outcomes:

  • Session attendees will be able to recognize and describe all six content areas in the SmartMusic library
  • Attendees will be able to outline the benefits of having their students practice with the built-in practice tools available in SmartMusic
  • Attendees will understand the benefits of a built-in sight-reading tool
  • Attendees will learn about the composition tool and its capabilities

Plans for participant involvement:

  • Participants will experience sight reading and “practicing” with SmartMusic
  • Participants may be asked to sight-sing during the clinic in order to experience the assessment and feedback
  • Participants may be asked about their ideas for incorporating composition into their curriculum with an online tool
  • Participants will be able to ask questions

From Lord of the Rings to Brahms: Ola Gjeilo’s Sunrise Mass

Clinician: Dr. Eric Posada

Session Description

Whether preparing a high school, community, church, or professional chorus for a performance in a recital hall or church venue, Ola Gjeilo’s Sunrise Mass is accessible and versatile enough to be included on most any program. This clinic will serve as a tangible blueprint of Ola Gjeilo’s Sunrise Mass for conductors, performers, and scholars. Having worked closely and directly with Gjeilo, Dr. Posada will share the insight gleaned from their time together. Scholarship will include visual and audio excerpts included in Posada’s dissertation, “Ola Gjeilo’s Sunrise Mass: A Conductor’s Guide” that will identify and compare Gjeilo’s essential melodic themes with works by composers that directly inspired him. Avid moviegoers, performers, and audience members, alike, will be transported back to scenes in a far-off land reminiscent of a battle between the warrior Beowulf and the monster Grendel or on an adventure with Bilbo Baggins in “Lord of the Rings”. Gjeilo’s fingerprint on the choral world lies herein with the marriage of cinematic and classical influences to his choral music.

What’s New at Q: New Resources from QuaverMusic

Clinician: Michele Hobizal

Session Description

QuaverMusic is always growing to meet the needs of teachers around the world. We develop new resources based on feedback from our teachers and students to create fun and engaging tools and projects. In this session attendees will learn more about some exciting projects we are working on. Come take a look at what’s new as we give you a behind-the-scenes look at how your suggestions evolve from a concept into new content for you and your students.

Cross Curricular Integration in the General Music Classroom

Clinician: Andrew Lesser

Session Description

The objective for this session is to assist teachers of elementary/middle school general music in incorporating the principles of cross curricular integration into their classrooms. The seminar will include how to seek out teachable elements of subjects outside of the arts through communication with one’s colleagues, research of the standards in each domain, and how to develop a unique, dynamic and fun curriculum that naturally involves relationships with these domains.

Session 5 (5:45 – 6:45 PM)

Retaining the Tech-Savvy Generation

Clinician: John Mlynczak

Session Description

Students today are highly engaged with technology, both at home and in school. How do we utilize technology to recruit and retain music students in music programs? This session will discuss current trends in student technology, demonstrate how to seamlessly integrate music technology lessons into a music class at any level, and provide a range of solutions for utilizing technology to increase student engagement and retention.

Transitioning From Music Student to Music Teacher

Clinician: Robert Pispecky

Session Description

The goal of this NJMAA Session is to provide practical information for future and novice Music Educators about making the transition from student to teacher. No college program can prepare every student for every position. In addition, the expectations of an inexperienced educator are often very different from the reality of being a music educator- even if the job they land is their “ideal”. This session will begin with the reflections several new teachers, describing their real life experiences-in some cases in contrast to the expectations they had while still a college student. The program will continue with questions, comments and practical advice from a panel of music administrators and the audience. The reflections and advice represent a valuable perspective for college students preparing for a career as a new music educator.

Beethoven Meets Spiderman: A Lesson in Social Justice

Clinician: Dr. Lisa DeLorenzo
Co-Presenter: Dr. Marissa Silverman

Session Description

This is a session on social justice through music that pairs the unlikely duo: Beethoven and Spider-man. The session presents a hands-on, participatory lesson that introduces Beethoven and Spider-man as to heroes in their time, both past and contemporary. Participants will first list characteristics that describe a hero/heroine which opens the door for a discussion on social justice. With some brief background of Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony and episodic features from a Spider-man movie, the participants will compare similarities and differences. This lesson introduces several of Beethoven’s works help students analyze and characterize the musical elements that create a mood of heroism. In addition, given a selection of classroom percussion and mallet instruments, participants will create their own interpretation of heroic music. There will be a short overview of 2 follow-up lessons with a student-created example of a Spider-man movie clip accompanied by one or more pieces from selected works by Beethoven (created on Garage Band). We will leave time for a Q & A section at the end.

Alone-Together: Strategies for Musical Growth and Community Building in the Virtual Music Classroom

Clinician: Dr. Jeremy Wiggins

Session Description

The pandemic has left music educators across the nation transitioning their instruction online. The shift in pedagogy has been particularly difficult for ensemble directors who have had to quickly adapt how they teach, assess, and connect with their students. This session will present teaching strategies, accessible technology, project based lessons, and collaborative activities that promote independent musical growth and community within a virtual setting. These strategies are adaptable to classes of varying type, age, and ability levels.

Band Arranging 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Arranging and Rescoring Music for Concert and Marching Bands

Clinician: Benjamin James Druffel

Session Description

Whether you direct a large concert band, a marching band, or just coach a chamber ensemble, a basic knowledge of arranging and scoring techniques allows you create music that suits the individual needs of your students. Instead of spending hours finding the right piece to fit their varied abilities, you can arrange a piece of music yourself and forge a musical experience that fits your ensemble’s own uniqueness. In addition to the musical benefits, there is also the financial benefit of saving money by not having to hire your own arranger. While many may see arranging as time consuming and challenging, it does not have to be. This clinic will introduce directors to easy tips they can use to create custom arrangements for concert and marching bands, as well as small chamber ensembles. Rescoring existing music to suit a varied instrumentation will also be covered as well as compliance of copyright law.

Friday, February 19, 2021

Session 1 (12:00 – 1:00 PM)

The MusicFirst Software Suite for Virtual & Hybrid Learning

Clinician: Dr. Jim Frankel

Session Description

Join us at this exciting session to learn about MusicFirst Classroom and the suite of integrated software for music education. Cloud-based and compatible across all devices (including mobile!), these software solutions are available to aid student learning in multiple areas, including: notation, sight reading, performance assessment, ear training, music theory, and so much more!

Kiss Your Ex (Music Program) Goodbye: How to Revolutionize Your Program, Please Your Administration, and Spark Joy in Your Teaching Schedule

Clinician: Elizabeth Nowik
Co-Presenters: Mike Aragones, Kyle Fairbanks, Jennifer Ketrow, Keren Ocasio, and Kiera Radvanski

Session Description

This panel-style forum will detail how the middle school music faculty of Franklin Township took over control of their course offerings and curriculum and completely reimagined what the ideal program for their student population should look like. The teachers will detail the process by which they took their vision and developed it into a fully formed proposal that made sense to their administration and guidance counselors. The focus of the panel will be to provide a resource to teachers who have often wished they could change their program, but feel they will be told no. Teachers who attend the panel will have a chance to anonymously submit the reasons they feel they can’t have their ideal program as well as participate in discussion and question and answer as the panelists use their knowledge of the process they went through to warn of missteps to avoid and success tips to try. Panelists will discuss how they created new, 21st-Century contemporary music courses that worked to better engage the middle school population, thus replacing courses that were of little to no interest to the general music consumer. This was an important factor in order to gain administrative support as they are constantly in need of meaningful elective courses and the music team felt the existing courses were not serving the student community. Streamlining and improving the course offerings also allowed schedule adjustments for band, orchestra, and chorus teachers to focus more closely on the more traditional music students every day. The panelists will explain what they learned from presenting their proposal to their administration – missteps and all – and how they were able to convince the administration to take a chance on a teacher-developed approach to choir, orchestra, band, and enhanced general music at the middle school level.

StringSpeak for the Non-String Major

Clinician: David Eccles

Session Description

Why do beginning band and beginning string classes sound different? Look no further than your favorite method book for the answer. Identifying and understanding the differences and similarities in instruction will help those with a limited background in strings overcome instructional challenges. Practical aspects of bowing and rehearsal strategies will also be explored. Resources for effective string orchestra rehearsing will also be presented.

Spark Creativity in your Instrumental Ensembles

Clinician: Mike Vecchio

Session Description

This session will provide tools and strategies for instrumental ensemble directors (elementary, middle school and high school levels) to help students meaningfully engage in creative music making. Topics will include student collaboration through musical conversations, sequence of teaching improvisation and examples of collaborative composition projects, all within the instrumental setting. Learning outcomes of the session include: Identifying the aspects of a safe and nurturing creative environment that allows instrumental students to share and collaborate in a constructive setting; Discussing strategies for incorporating elements of the creative process (listening, improvising and composing) into the instrumental classroom in meaningful, engaging ways; and considering the role of the instrumental music teacher as a facilitator to guide the creative process.

The Neurodiverse Music Classroom: Using Strengths of Special Learners and All Students

Clinician: Brian J. Wagner-Yeung

Session Description

Neurodiversity is a fairly new trend focusing on incorporating strength-based learning in the classroom, and celebrating students’ different brain levels. This session will focus on creating a neurodiverse classroom setting by incorporating positive niche construction in musical environments. Such examples include: strength awareness, universal design for learning, and creating environmental modification. This session will cover elementary to secondary settings, in addition to classroom music to performance ensembles.

Conducting Gestures Suitable for Beautiful Singing

Clinician: Dr. Derrick L. Thompson

Session Description

When an ensemble is on stage, it is the conductor’s role to ensure that “a unified, balanced performance,” is produced. While numerous rehearsals may lead to performance day, the conductor must remind performers on stage through gestures. The performer may have score markings, but it is the conductor’s gestures that communicate what they are asking of from the ensemble. In a choral ensemble, the conductor not only takes on the role of making sure the group stays on the beat but also ensures the group enters at the right time and shapes the phrases appropriately. The choral conductor must also demonstrate and demand beautiful singing through their conducting gestures. This session provides a perspective on how a choral conductor communicates beautiful singing, focusing on the definition of conducting, what is beautiful singing, and what choral conducting gestures can be used to communicate beautiful singing.

Moving Beyond Cultural Competence to Anti-Racism

Clinician: Alysia Lee

Session Description

Join Maryland arts education leader, Alysia Lee for an interactive workshop exploring shifts that elevate instructional practice and student achievement through educator self-reflection, collaboration and action. 

Session 2 (1:15 – 2:15 PM)

Cloud-Based Tech Tools for Virtual & Hybrid Learning in Music Education

Clinician: Robin Hodson

Session Description

As technology has become a critical tool throughout the education system, it is vital that teachers understand how these tools can be harnessed to engage students and streamline their own workflow. During this session, attendees will engage in a discussion about the technology they currently use in their classrooms and will learn about software and devices they may not currently use or may not be using to their fullest potential. Robin will demonstrate software designed specifically for music education and discuss how this technology can be used to enhance creativity, musicality, and increase student engagement both in and out of the classroom environment. Software to be introduced: MusicFirst Classroom, PracticeFirst, Sight Reading Factory, Noteflight Learn, Flat for Education, and Soundtrap for Education.

The End Is The Beginning: Utilizing Reverse Planning

Clinician: Joe Akinskas

Session Description

Why Reverse Design? The research indicates that having a clear final objective, with scheduled benchmarks at the outset of the course, provides a consistent learning and assessment continuum. This interactive session will begin with examples of the need and purpose for reverse design, coupled with participants implementing the components into a semester learning plan.

Teaching Today and Tomorrow: Answers to Teachers’ Current Concerns (Part Two)

Clinician: Peter Loel Boonshaft

Session Description

Every day seems to pose new challenges for music teachers.  How’s that for an understatement?!  This session will field more recent questions from teachers about today’s most pressing issues.

Shades of Success: Reflections on Statewide Participation with Equity Considerations

Clinician: Robert J. Hamm

Session Description

Participants in state wide and region level ensembles gain a valuable experience through their hard work and dedication. But in today’s world we must ask the questions, are these groups truly representative of all students? Are we being culturally responsive to our community? We will share some of the work of the NJMEA IDEA committee, and discuss actionable steps that all music teachers can take to answer “yes” to our questions. Framework for Presentation Introduction, purpose, objectives

  • Reviewing the Data
    • Review of Performance Literature of All State Ensembles
    • Review of Participants Demographic Profiles of All State and Region Ensembles
    • Impact when compared to statewide data
  • Bottom Line
    • Are we truly being culturally responsive to our students and communities?
    • Are All State and Region Ensembles truly representative of all students?
  • Actionable steps: Discussion
    • What can individual teachers do?
    • What can our overall programs do?
    • Where do we need more research?

Fertile Ground: A Framework for Middle Level General Music

Clinician: Stephanie Cronenberg

Session Description

In my work as a music educator, I have regularly heard the term “dumping ground” used to refer to certain classes, particularly middle level general music (Cronenberg, 2016; under review). The use of the term “dumping ground” within schools and the field of music education is prevalent and demonstrates deficit thinking about students and learning (Delpit, 1995; Valencia, 1997). A “dumping ground” attitude does not affirm the teachers or the students in middle level general music classes and often places unnecessary barriers between music teachers and their administrators, colleagues, and students. Yes, there are challenges to teaching middle level general music, but deficit thinking hinders educators and their students. Just because students cannot always choose to enroll in our general music class does not mean that they are “dumped” into our classroom as a last resort, are lacking in some fundamental way, or possess no desire to be musically inspired. Students required to enroll in general music are being given a gift—the gift to try on a musician-, composer-, arranger-, listener-, and/or critic-identity—and to see any of these identities inspires them to future musical learning. The title of this session, Fertile Ground, purposefully inverts the phrase “dumping ground,” language I seek to eradicate from the field. As music educators, it is important that we face the challenges of middle level general music with a positive outlook. There is a need for music educators to critically examine the curriculum and pedagogy currently used and to consider changes that will meet students’ developmental needs, improve learning outcomes, and increase engagement. Middle level general music, whether called music exploratory, music technology, or by some other name, deserves attention and teachers willing to reframe their expectations, their attitudes toward their students, and their view of themselves as music educators. Middle level general music is not about flashy concerts, winning contests, or producing high level performances. Middle level general music is, however, about inspiring all students to engage more deeply with music. Bringing the ideas of the middle level concept into music education discourse provides one avenue for creating a fertile ground in middle school general music and for extolling the unacknowledged “fertile grounds” that already exist in music classrooms of all shapes and sizes. This session will engage participants in a discussion of their own middle level (5th-8th grade) general music through the lens of the “Fertile Ground Framework” a visual tool I have designed to help music teachers rethink middle level general music. The Fertile Ground Framework is a practical tool to guide a teacher’s curricular and pedagogical decision-making by uniting the middle level concept and the National Core Arts Standards. The framework emphasizes the developmental needs and cultural identities of the particular students in the classroom and provides a lens through which the teacher can support the unique needs of the students in their classroom. The Fertile Ground Framework provides one avenue for creating a fertile ground in middle level general music and for extolling the unacknowledged fertile grounds that already exist in music classrooms of all shapes and sizes. In this session, teachers will engage in an example curricular activity and then use their participation in this activity as a springboard to discuss the Fertile Ground Framework. Practical curricular and pedagogical examples along with stories of teachers working in schools around the country will be shared and participants will have an opportunity to reflect on their own practice. References Cronenberg, S. (2016). Music at the middle: Principles that guide middle level general music teachers (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (1857495335). Cronenberg, S. (under review). Music teachers’ perceptions of general music as a required middle level course. RMLE: Research in Middle Level Online. Delpit, L. (1995). Other people’s children: Cultural conflict in the classroom. New York: The New Press. Valencia, R. R. (1997). The evolution of deficit thinking: Educational thought and practice. Washington, DC: Falmer Press.

Intentional Choral Warm-Ups: Skill Building & Accountability

Clinician: Dr. Eric Posada

Session Description

This topic is crucial to the development of singers, choirs, and directors. Ironically, it is also a subject that remains a collective mystery. My primary objective is for middle school and high school choral directors to return to their home schools and reinvent their current warm-up routine. Warm-up exercises should be treated akin to repertoire rehearsals via constant assessment, immediate feedback, and effective solutions. Consequently, these exercises will build vocal technique, aural skills, musicianship, and awareness in singers that will transfer to the choral repertoire and rehearsal. To achieve my goal, I will use the convention audience to provide tangible examples of my methodology. I shall use a varied collection of warm-ups from familiar exercises to specific drills that encourage voice building skills, chord tuning, vowel unification, open/closed vowels, dynamic contrast, consonants and enunciation, simple and advanced kinesthetic movements, and stretching.

Creating Interactive Music Classrooms and Choice Boards for Any Learning Environment

Clinician: Shawna Longo
Co-Presenter: Amy Burns

Session Description

Have you seen the latest craze? Everyday we see new posts of amazing Interactive Classrooms and Choice Boards to support distance learning. But, how do they do it? Where do I begin? Focusing on Google Slides and Canva, this workshop will take you through the process in simple, easy-to-do steps where you will leave ready to try it out for yourself!

REED Between the Lines: Improving your clarinet section by correcting commonly overlooked problems

Clinician: Miles DeCastro
Co-Presenter: Christine Hoerning

Session Description

Faculty members from the Crane School of Music will give an overview of often-overlooked clarinet equipment and repair problems, from the perspectives of repair technician and artist-educator. A properly functioning instrument, combined with a proper mouthpiece, ligature, reeds, care equipment, and other accessories will make your clarinet section unstoppable. Don’t let disrepair and faulty equipment cause frustration for you or your clarinets! This clinic will include live repair demonstration and samples of suggested equipment.

  • Remove barriers to all aspects of performance
  • Rehearse and refine your ensemble effectively and efficiently when the clarinet section has the proper tools to create music
  • Present a polished final product to the public with properly functioning clarinets
  • Clarinetists will be able to evaluate and improve their musicianship if they understand that their equipment should not be a barrier
Session 3 (2:30 – 3:30 PM)

Distance and Hybrid Strategies for Teaching Music Theory & Composition

Clinician: Marjorie LoPresti

Session Description

Making music together while apart is the new normal. Embrace change and welcome opportunities to individualize music learning and expression through theory and composition activities. This session will combine best practices in distance learning with strategies for flipped classroom and blended learning. Topics will include lesson ideas, software options, hardware essentials, and strategies for ensemble classes as well as middle and high school general music, music tech, and theory courses. This session will cover techniques that you can use with your students, tips to help stay organized, and pitfalls to avoid.

Adapted Music: Differentiation for all Learners

Clinician: Lauren Shanahan

Session Description

The session will focus on ways to adapt music instruction for students with disabilities in the public school system. This includes general music, as well as performance ensembles. Key components of special education will be covered, as well as how New Jersey implements them.

Equity, Diversity, & NJMEA

Clinician: Katherine Brodhead Cullen

Session Description

This session builds upon 2020’s “Next Steps in Urban Education.” During this session, participants will learn about actions taking place across NJMEA to promote access for students from low-income backgrounds (for example, fee waivers and transportation assistance for regional events). Then, participants will divide into 3 breakout groups to discuss one of the following topics: student access and participation, music educators from diverse backgrounds, or culturally-responsive teaching practices. At the end of the session, the groups will reconvene to share their ideas and make recommendations for ways that NJMEA can support equity and access for all music students and educators.

Transitioning K-12 Music Courses Online During COVID-19: Music Teacher Experiences Around the World

Clinician: Argine Safari

Session Description

Music educators around the world had to rapidly switch to online teaching due to the COVID-19 school closures. This unexpected shift to online teaching created challenges for performing arts music educators but also presented unique opportunities for developing new forms of teacher knowledge, motivating music educators to find different insrtructional approaches through innovative uses of technology. The presenter connected with and interviewed numerous K-12 music educators across the nation as well as around the world (Finland, Russia, France, Germany, Greece, Armenia) to learn more about their online teaching experiences. During this session, participants will learn about the ways K-12 music educators around the world modified their pedagogy and implemented technology when transitioning general music and performing courses from face-to-face to online. Included in the session will be teacher interviews and original project ideas with videos, pictures, and student interviews. Participants will have an opportunity to share their own experiences and will have a discussion on how the COVID-19 online teaching experience has changed music teachers’ view of the future of music education.

Literature that Educates and Entertains

Clinician: Emily Crocker

Session Description

Emily Crocker shares her ideas on the best music for middle school treble, mixed and combination choirs and gives tips on programming and adapting published arrangements for your choir’s unique needs. Also included, suggestions on getting your music published and exposed to a wider audience. (Includes music packet)

One Musician’s ‘Trash’ is Another Musician’s Instrument: A Composition Unit in Social Justice for the General Music Classroom

Clinician: Edward Easse

Session Description

As music educators, we should always be looking to incorporate themes of social justice in our classrooms. I developed this unit to help my students to not only be creative, but to also reflect upon the ways in which their own musicking is structured. The first time I taught this unit, my students left with more questions than answers, a quality I find to be necessary in order to continue growth and thinking. By comparing our music classroom to a music classroom in Paraguay, students can truly immerse themselves in a culture that may be unfamiliar. After the discussion, we get to creating, and this is where the fun begins. My students love making their own instruments for this particular unit, and they also love recording and editing on Audacity. Overall, this is truly a meaningful unit for my students at the end of the year, and I hope to be able to share this with other music educators in the state.

Recruit, Retain, RESULTS in Female Band Directing

Clinician: Jenna DiSalvio
Co-Presenter: Deborah Gianuzzi

Session Description

Women Band Directors International members Jenna DiSalvio and Debbie Gianuzzi return to co-present for the fourth time a session centered around the support and advocacy for female band directors. This session will be focused on how we can support aspiring, new, and current female band directors from middle school, where a student first starts spreading their musical wings, through college, at the start of their careers as they prepare for interviews and navigating their first year of teaching, along the path of possible motherhood, marriage, etc., while potentially starting advanced degrees, and beyond! The session will include demographics and facts to showcase where the divides occur and strategies on how and where to make changes. Join us for this uplifting and supportive chat!

Teaching Guitar Using Technology

Clinician: Richard McCready

Session Description

Presenters will learn proven practices for ensuring that Guitar students remain engaged in learning, even when not physically present in school. Guitarists love to make music together, so being isolated brings new challenges. Richard McCready will demonstrate proven strategies and successful resources to ensure Guitar students feel valued and continue making progress as musicians.

Exhibits (3:45 – 4:45 PM)

Session 4 (4:30 – 5:30 PM)

Region 1 – North Jersey School Music Association Meeting

President, NJSMA: Diana May

Music Software Integrations for Google Classroom

Clinician: Jim Frankel

Session Description

During this session, you’ll be introduced to cloud-based technology designed specifically for music education that integrates with your existing technology, including Google Classroom. You’ll see how this technology works on various devices and get real-world examples of how this can be incorporated into your curriculum. Find out how these tools can lighten your workload by streamlining grading, lesson planning, and assessments, while simultaneously helping you meet school and district technology requirements.

Music for Diverse Learners: Social Emotional Learning

Clinician: Angela Guerriero
Co-Presenters: Jodi Jianniney and Andrew Vensel

Session Description

Social emotional learning (SEL) is complementary to music education, especially the education of students with IEPs and diverse learning needs. Music therapists often work on social skills and social emotional learning with school age students, and many of these techniques also work well in a music classroom. Music educators are now expected to address social emotional competence in the classroom, often without much training or support. Some social emotional skills that may be addressed in the music classroom include the prevention of behavioral challenges and student engagement in learning. The SEL framework is helpful when teaching students with IEPs about social awareness, self-management, and relationship skills. These social and emotional goals are also often included in students’ IEPs. As many students with disabilities may thrive in the music classroom, this is an appropriate place for music educators and music therapists to work together to best support students with IEPs. Students with exceptionalities can benefit from social emotional learning infused into the music classroom. Universal design for learning principles can benefit all students through the flexibility of design, equal access, and engagement. Using UDL principles, all students can participate in social emotional learning in the music classroom, especially students with disabilities. Students without disabilities can learn how to work cooperatively with classmates who have learning differences. Session topics will include Universal Design for Learning principles applicable to SEL music learning as well as sample music activities. Examples of student work will be presented. A music education and music therapy perspective will be shared, along with the overlap between the fields, professional safety for the music educator, and music therapy scope of practice related to social emotional learning and student social goals.

The Digital String Class: Powerful Tools for the 21st Century String Music Educators

Clinician: David Eccles

Session Description

Incorporating technology in the instrumental classroom can be exciting for some and daunting for others; but in the current climate, the need for effective and efficient technology is critical. Sound instrumental pedagogy, thorough preparation, and excellent teaching practices are essential to great teaching, and incorporating the right technology in the right way can enhance each of these areas. The result is an engaging teaching environment and an effective method of helping students grow their love and enjoyment of music and achieve your instructional goals. In this clinic, teachers will learn how to use Essential Elements Interactive (EEi) to teach instrumental pedagogy, music theory, ear-training, intonation, and more. EEi is the intuitive online resource that comes with the Essential Elements Band and Strings method books. It provides an online music studio for practicing and recording both music from the book and any other assigned music. Teachers can also add personalized video and printed music resources, and tools to connect fellow teachers, students, and parents. Whether you are a tech guru or novice, this clinic will demonstrate ways to let technology work for teachers and students as they navigate the “new normal.”

Rhythm – Easy as Pie!

Clinician: Lenna Harris

Session Description

Students can repeat rhythms that you clap, tap or sing for them. Have you ever noticed children are able to clap rhythms independently but cannot play or sing those same rhythms in a song? With her colorful rhythm pie charts, Lenna will present a fun, proven method for teaching rhythm. Rhythm Pie™ Charts are ideal for teaching music reading skills to your young students. The following general suggestions have been used with all of the charts with great success. You, no doubt, will have your own unique and creative ways to use the charts. You may teach the Rhythm Pie™ Charts in a variety of ways. Have your students:

  • Say the charts aloud “ONE, TWO, CLAP AND SAY.”
  • Clap or tap the charts using rhythm sticks, mallets or unpitched rhythm instruments.
  • Sing the charts first using the same pitch, then assign different pitches to different groups.
  • Create a pot-n-pan band by bringing in old pots and pans, spatulas and spoons. Different size pots and pans will produce different timbers.
  • Make class compositions based upon the charts. Play the charts with pitched rhythm instruments using “ONE, TWO, TAP AND PLAY.”

In order to facilitate assessment, you will want to reduce the number of students clapping the charts at one time so you may more easily watch, listen and assess their progress. You may accomplish this goal in a number of ways.

  • Divide students into groups according to the months of their birthdays. (ie.: Go through each individual month or group the months – everyone with a birthday in January, February and March, then April, May and June, etc.)
  • Have the girls clap the chart and then have the boys clap the chart.
  • Separate the class into groups based upon other criteria like names beginning with certain letters, eye color, etc.
  • Create two or more groups by giving your students different color rhythm sticks. Have each group of students with the same color rhythm sticks tap the charts.

In order to help your students transfer their music reading skills, have them match rhythm patterns from the charts to rhythm patterns in songs from their classroom texts. Print a number of charts from the CD ROM. Line the charts up on the floor and assign pitched or unpitched rhythm instruments for each line or for each chart. The children love making music and you will find that they quickly learn the rhythms. The charts are an excellent tool for substitute teachers. Students enjoy showing the substitute teacher how to use the charts. Leave a lesson plan which includes a rhythm review. After completing all of the charts, go back to the beginning and have students say each chart using the syllable system of your choice. MOST OF ALL – HAVE FUN!! Let us know what variations you use for the Rhythm Pie™ Charts!!!

Trombone Technique – Troubleshooting common problems for the elementary, middle and high school trombonist

Clinician: Justin Halat

Session Description

The trombone technique session is intended to focus on developing a good foundation for elementary, middle and high school trombone/brass students. The session will cover the following areas of concern with trombone players:

  1. Elementary/Beginning Trombonists
    1. Posture
    2. Breathing
    3. Embouchure
    4. Vowels
    5. Mouthpiece Buzzing
    6. Long tones
    7. Natural Slurs
  2. Middle School
    1. Reinforcing learned techniques (Embouchure, breathing, vowels)
    2. Importance of vowels
    3. Mouthpiece buzzing pitches
    4. Lip Flexibility exercises
    5. Tongued exercises
  3. High School
    1. Reinforcing learned techniques (Embouchure, breathing, vowels)
    2. Importance of vowels
    3. Advanced lip flexibility exercises
    4. Scale exercises

Women who give a ‘voice’ to women’s (or treble) voices

Clinician: Dr. Eric Rubinstein

Session Description

In an effort to promote gender equality, conductors at every level are striving to find repertoire that supports inclusive programming. This reading session is intended for directors of women’s or treble choirs who are searching for repertoire that will empower their singers. Aside from the music presented, this session will also briefly discuss pedagogical application, thematic programming, social and emotional learning, and cultural norms. Works to include choral “chestnuts” as well as culturally responsive and reflective music.

Body, Soul, and Spirit: Leading Rehearsals that Inspire Expressive Music Making

Clinician: Benjamin James Druffel

Session Description

Legendary music educator Weston Noble taught that in order for a conductor to inspire musical expression, the ensemble must experience music through the Body, Soul (mind) and Spirit. When these three are in alignment, you enter a state of mind he called the “Special World” — a feeling of wholeness that allows us to become more vulnerable and open to expressing ourselves through music. We all have experienced a moment like this in our lives as musicians at some point and it may be the reason many of us become music educators ourselves. Inspiring our own students to enter this realm with us though, can be a challenge. This clinic is designed for conductors of both instrumental and vocal ensembles. Attendees will learn rehearsal techniques that will encourage both the conductor and students to free themselves of inhibitions and inspire expressive musicianship. The clinic will also include a short conducting workshop where attendees will be introduced to conducting techniques designed to expand their own expressive gestural vocabulary leading to inspired music making through the Body, Soul, and Spirit.

A Guide to Higher Adjudication Scores

Clinician: Frank L. Hughes. Sr

Session Description

Are you tired of disagreeing with an Adjudicator’s evaluation of your performing group? Here are some tips to improve their perception of your performance.

Session 5 (5:45 – 6:45 PM)

Arrangement, Improvisation, and Accompaniment for Flexible String Orchestra

Clinician: Bryan Charles Wilson

Session Description

This session is based on my composition, Kallaloo, which is a flexible reggae inspired string orchestra piece (9-12). I will educate the orchestra teachers on using this customizable arrangement in which the three lines: Melody, Harmony, and Bassline, are written out for each instrument. Customize whatever arrangement you want! Want the cellos and basses to play the melody, violins to play the harmony, and violas to do the bassline? Go for it! Want violas on melody, cellos on harmony, and violins and basses on bassline? It’s easy! You can even have instruments trade parts during the song so every section has a chance to shine. In addition, Kallaloo has a bridge section for improvisation! But don’t worry, if the teachers and/or students are unsure about what notes to use, there is a cheat sheet that breaks it down for them. I will go in depth on strategies as to how to get kids improvising! Have your students ever wanted to know how to accompany a melody without having anything specific written for them? By providing easy, medium, and hard rhythms, I’ll show the teachers how students can make their own Bassline and Harmony parts.

Turning Drummers Into Percussionists!

Clinician: Chris Colaneri

Session Description

This hands on workshop is not only a refresher course of your percussion methods class from college but an in-depth look at the six components of the “Total Percussion” approach to turning drummers into percussionists. Instruments covered: Snare Drum, Mallets, Timpani, Traps, World Percussion, and Drum Set. Concepts covered: Structuring the group lesson and school year to incorporate a total percussion curriculum, keeping your percussion section busy during band rehearsals, percussion part assignments for band, auditions for lesson placement, starting a percussion ensemble and much more…

General Music: Going the Distance

Clinician: John Mlynczak
Co-Presenter: Jo Lynn Cookus

Session Description

We are living in unprecedented and unpredictable times. Teachers have been thrown into the uncharted territory of trying to teach young students at home. General music education involves lots of interaction within a classroom. So, what’s a teacher to do when suddenly they have to provide instruction or guidance to their students from afar? Hal Leonard’s Essential Elements Music Class, the powerful new cloud-based teaching tool for K-5 general music features over 400 songs, listening maps, interactive games and activities, as well as recorder and ukulele units. The user-friendly, streaming technology works brilliantly with laptops, tablets and even smartphones – so students can enjoy the music, use the resources, play music games, and explore on their own at home. In this interactive session, Gregory Roman will guide you through EEMC’s songs, teaching resources, and lessons. You will learn how to easily create Playlists and Class Collections for your students, without the need for them to create an account or register on the site. You will also have the opportunity to create your own pilot credentials. Jo Lynn Cookus taught music in the Texas public schools for 34 years, teaching high school and junior high band and elementary music. She has been the music director at Airline United Methodist Church for 24 years, leading worship as well as directing children’s, youth and adult handbells and choirs. Her choirs have traveled in the U.S. and to Belize, Central America, and were invited to perform at the Texas Music Educators Association conference. She has presented workshops to many districts across Texas on elementary music, music technology and curriculum. She currently lives in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, where she is active in her church choir and handbells. She also directs a community handbell ensemble.

Teaching Today and Tomorrow: Answers to Teachers’ Current Concerns (Part One)

Clinician: Peter Loel Boonshaft

Session Description

Every day seems to pose new challenges for music teachers.  How’s that for an understatement?!  This session will field recent questions from teachers about today’s most pressing issues.

Scoring and Arranging with Finale

Clinician: Kevin Mead

Session Description

Learn how easy it is to compose, arrange, edit, transpose, listen to, and print your music with Finale. Learn the tricks that make this process faster and more enjoyable so you can get back to teaching music sooner. Converting scores to MusicXML and import to SmartMusic to guide student practice. LEARNER OUTCOMES:

  1. Attendees will be able to use the Finale “Selection” tool shortcuts.
  2. Attendees will learn the most efficient ways to enter lyrics and arrange
  3. Music for different ensembles
  4. Attendees will be able to format Finale scores and parts in the most efficient ways.
  5. Attendees will be able to enter markings and expressions in the most efficient ways.
    • Repeats, endings, and Coda sign
    • Score Manager → changing instrumentation
    • Page Layout
    • Printing Parts
    • Sharing your music with others

Plans for participant involvement:

  • Participants will be able to ask questions

Teaching Music to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Clinician: Maureen Butler

Session Description

This workshop will provide an understanding into the characteristics commonly seen in students with autism spectrum disorder. Deficits in the areas of communication, social skills and sensory integration can markedly affect student behaviors in music class. By understanding their students’ special needs, teachers will learn how to adapt their teaching to foster a better learning environment for children with ASD.

Video Games in the Music Classroom

Clinician: Andrew Lesser

Session Description

Music education may have the potential to benefit from video game technology, though limited research exists that delves specifically into the field. The principles of game-based learning directly apply to the conditions that video games instill in the player, including creativity, challenge, feedback, and engagement. Researchers who have conducted studies involving music performance-based video games have noted that they promote a sense of positive self-identity, self-esteem, and enjoyment. This seminar is designed to explore the ways and means that video games can be incorporated into music education while promoting standard-based teaching.

Saturday, February 20, 2021

Session 1 (9:00 – 10:15 AM)

Noteflight Learn for Composition, Recording, and Assessments

Clinician: John Mlynczak

Session Description

Noteflight Learn provides the ability for all students to compose, record, access digital content, and assess their performance with SoundCheck™. With full integration for Google Classroom and other popular Learning Management Systems, thousands of included musical scores, and both composition and performance assessment, Noteflight Learn is the ideal platform for teaching and learning music. This session will demonstrate lessons at all levels as well as provide free trials for all attendees.

Creating Diverse Performance Opportunities

Clinician: Miguel Bolivar
Co-Presenter: Joe Bergen

Session Description

Executive Director of Mantra Percussion Inc., and Highland Park music educator Miguel Bolivar, along with Artistic Director of Mantra Percussion Inc., and Luis Munoz Marin School for Social Justice music educator Joe Bergen, will lead an in depth discussion into the creative side of programming your concert season by developing unique and rewarding experiences that give your program an identity and bring pride and recognition to your students and community. Having worked together in the Rahway School District for 6 years and developing “Mantra Youth Percussion” as a resident youth ensemble offered tuition free to students from Rahway, we conceived and implemented a program that garnered national recognition with offering varying opportunities for our students from performances in NYC (Carnegie Hall), to competing at national competitions (WGI World Championships), to creating professionally produced music videos and albums, to working with Pulitzer Prize winning composers and receiving critical acclaim from the New York Times among many others. All this was accomplished with little to no budget but with an eye to creative problem solving and creating a network of collaborators from all areas of music to assist in offering students these opportunities. The session will outline steps an educator can make to create similar experiences and ways to problem solve potential obstacles. We will show video examples of Mantra Youth Percussion as well as other highly innovative programs including the Young People’s Chorus of NYC, OneBeat, the Kaufman Music Center, Special Music School, and Face the Music, who have all helped in shaping new models of music education. We’ll also provide resources for educators looking to research opportunities more and allow time for Q and A discussion with audience members. Our “Inclusiveness, Diversity, Equity, Access” component will talk about breaking barriers in the concert music/ art music arena in working with a diverse lists of composers and organizations that represent the society we live in, and how to establish long lasting and meaningful relationships that result in endless collaborative possibilities. As representatives of an internationally recognized performing arts organization that is led by people of color and giving tuition free opportunities to BIPOC students, we’re hoping to advocate for more representation of diverse people in the education world, performance world, and the spaces in which these two worlds can meet.

Flipgrid: Easily Exchanging and Creating Videos with your Students

Clinician: Rina Sklar

Session Description

The pandemic has thrown us into a whole new world of distance learning/teaching and required us to search for the best, most effective online platforms and resources for staying connected with our students. We need these platforms to be easy to set up and use. Rina will present Flipgrid, a free program for educators which allows teachers and students to easily record and upload videos. You can use Flipgrid to comprehensively share materials and lessons with your students while tailoring your desired amount of student response and interaction. Rina will share step-by-step instructions for setting up the platform so that you may use it for any aspect of your music curriculum. She will also provide specific examples of how she uses Flipgrid with her recorder classes. The session will address student privacy concerns and show videos that Rina has successfully used with her students.

Working Together: Improving Middle Level General Music Through Collaborative PD

Clinician: Stephanie Cronenberg
Co-Presenters: Anqi Tang, Kristin Bungert, Kiera Radvanski, and Jackeline Ovale

Session Description

The first statement of agreement listed in The Housewright Declaration (1999) identifies the right of all people “to participate fully in the best music experiences possible” (p. 1). Yet once a student leaves elementary school, musical opportunities for students who choose not to participate in ensembles decrease as students age (McEwin & Greene, 2011). This decrease in opportunity not only conflicts with the goals set by the field of music education, but also with the tenets of middle level pedagogy focused on developmentally appropriate, well-rounded curriculum for all young adolescents (Alexander, et al., 1968; Beane, 1990; Eichhorn, 1966; George, et al., 1992). Although grounded in the democratic principles of inclusion of all students and comprehensive musical content (Abril, 2016), whether all students have access to diverse and quality musical experiences through general music at grades 5-8 often remains the responsibility of the school, and more specifically, the individual music teacher. Unfortunately, many music teachers are underprepared to teach middle level general music. According to Kiera, a participant in this study, her preservice “general music instruction was only focused on PreK-4” while Jackeline claimed her preservice preparation taught her “nothing” about teaching general music to grades 5-8. Thus, in-service professional development related to teaching middle level general music is critical for music teachers who teach this course. During the 2019-2020 school year, three middle level general music teachers, a music faculty member and a doctoral student engaged in a year-long collaborative action research study (Stringer, 2014). The goal of this project was to support these experienced NJ music educators to set improvement goals for their practice teaching 5th-8th grade general music. In this session, the three NJ music educators who participated in this study will form a panel to discuss the experience participating in this yearlong collaborative professional development. These teachers will discuss why they participated, the curricular changes they made, their successes and challenges during the process, and the impact of COVID-19 on their experience. The teachers will also discuss their perspectives on the long-term collaborative professional development model used during this project and the mutual support they received from one another during 2019-2020. References Abril, C. R. (2016). Untangling general music education: Concept, aims, and practice. In C. R. Abril & B. M. Gault (Eds.), Teaching general music: Approaches, issues, and viewpoints (pp. 5-22). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Alexander, W. M., Williams, E. L., Compton, M., Hines, V. A., Prescott, D., & Kealy, R. (1968). The emergent middle school (2nd enlarged ed.). New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Beane, J. A. (1990). A middle school curriculum: From rhetoric to reality. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association. Eichhorn, D. H. (1966). The middle school. New York, NY: The Center for Applied Research in Education. George, P. S., Stevenson, C., Thomason, J., & Beane, J. (1992). The middle school – and beyond. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Housewright Symposium on the Future of Music Education. (1999). Housewright Declaration. In Vision 2020: the Housewright Symposium on the Future of Music Education. Reston, VA: MENC. Retrieved from https://nafme.org/about/history/vision-2020-the-housewright-symposium-on-the-future-of-music-education/ McEwin, C. K., & Greene, M. W. (2011). The status of programs and practices in America’s middle schools: Results from two national studies. Westerville, OH: Association for Middle Level Education. Stringer, E. T. (2014). Action Research (4th ed.). Los Angeles, CA: Sage.

Teaching Brass?

Clinician: Gilles Bernard

Session Description

The teaching of brass instruments is an important component of school music programs since they are an integral part of the ensembles that make these programs. This session will cover and reinforce basic and advance concepts as they apply to the teaching of brass instruments in the standard concert band and orchestra. The sessions will be divided into the following components:

  1. Test Your Knowledge: Attendees will fill out a survey to test their knowledge of the fundamentals of brass performance.
  2. The Fundamentals: A detailed presentation of the fundamentals of brass playing. The topics included will be embouchure formation, articulation/tonguing, breathing, the importance of holding the instrument correctly, differences and similarities between high and low brass instruments. Teaching tips and pitfalls to avoid when teaching these elements will be addressed.
  3. Moving On From The Basics: lip slurs, legato/slurring on valve and slide instruments, range development, multiple tonguing, advanced fingering/use of alternate slide positions as they relate to key signature and the harmonic series.
  4. Resources: A survey of valuable resources and literature available to help implement and develop music performance on brass instruments.

New Jersey Young Composers Competition Finals

Clinician: Andrew Lesser

Session Description

Students who have been chosen as finalists for the 12th annual New Jersey Young Composers Competition will participate in a interview and critique held by a professional composer. Awards will be presented along with a performance of each piece.

Session 2 (10:30 – 11:30 AM)

Data Storytelling for Music Educators

Clinician: Dr. Jim Frankel

Session Description

This session will introduce educators to accessible data modeling techniques designed to help effectively communicate student achievement to stakeholders, including school and district administrators. By identifying the specific and measurable data points key to determining the efficacy of instructional practices, we’ll explore how to systematically collect and analyze data, draw conclusions from statistics, and then present these findings to stakeholders in a clear, visually compelling manner. By creating data-driven narratives, music educators will be able to more effectively advocate for their programs. Attendees will be introduced to free data modeling and design software tools to create compelling presentations and advocacy documents.

Remote Elementary Music “Tips, Tricks, and Activities”

Clinician: Kody Andreas

Session Description

Discover tips, tricks and activities to engage your students in remote elementary music instruction. Learn how to create a safe-space for music while adapting your instruction to fit the remote model of learning. Topics include adapting games, movement experiences, virtual instruments, remote elementary chorus, attention grabbers, lesson transitions and more. 

Percussion Methods Class Refresher from B to X (Bongos to Xylophone)

Clinician: John Leister

Session Description

Unless a band, orchestra, or choir director is a percussionist, the world of percussion can be daunting. The Percussion Methods Class Refresher gives educators the opportunity to review the important foundational aspects of playing the vast array of percussion instruments. Starting with basic snare drum technique, I will review the natural stroke that is both healthy for the body and one that produces the best tone. Two key displays will involve a tennis ball and the HingeStix. I will share strategies from my teachers and colleagues (NY Philharmonic, Metropolitan Opera, NYC Ballet) as well as typical challenges I have seen from other 35 years teaching percussion students. I will demonstrate quick but effective exercises to help with a musical roll, flam, double stroke, and single stroke. I will move to timpani and mallet percussion and demonstrate how the basic snare technique applies to those areas. I will demonstrate timpani tuning practices as well as techniques for musical mallet percussion performances. I will share a series of warm-up exercises I have created for the concert band percussion section while the band uses long tone scales. Following this, I will demonstrate techniques on smaller percussion instruments ranging from bongos to congas to triangle. Because of the volume of information, I will also provide short video clips and resources for both students and teachers to use for review, practice, and further study. Finally, I will incorporate short stories from my experiences playing on Broadway tours, playing in the Paragon Ragtime Orchestra, for the Paul Taylor Dance Company, and behind several rock artists (Metallica, Paul McCartney, Sting) and how each experience shaped my approach to teaching and performing.

Using Ukulele and Technology in Modern Band

Clinician: Bryan Powell

Session Description

Come and explore the beautiful marriage between using technology and the ukulele! Participants will leave the session with a multitude of free and resourceful ideas to use in their classroom. While popular music can be a powerful tool for generating interest in music, many teachers steeped in formal learning struggle to apply informal techniques to unfamiliar music. This workshop-demonstration is centered on the belief that all people are musical, demonstrated quickly and in an enjoyable manner for all ages by leveraging the musical choices of the individual.

Passing the “Audition”: Strategies for Applying and Interviewing for Teaching Positions in Music

Clinician: Members of the NJMAA

Session Description

In this session, you’ll hear from experienced music administrators about the techniques that can help make your job interview a success. Topics will include: Finding Job Postings, Applying, Cover Letter/Resume, Sample Interview Questions, General Guidelines for Answers, What To Do/Not Do In an Interview, Demo Lessons, and Interview Follow-ups. Demo interviews will be used to model and discuss these techniques. Presented by NJMAA: The NJ Music Administrators Association.

Session 3 (11:45 – 12:45 AM)

Building Community and Sustaining Growth During COVID

Clinician: Dr. Lucy Chen

Session Description

COVID-19 has created unimaginable challenges for the performing arts industry, shuttering doors and bankrupting some of the most prominent institutions. Community music schools have been presented with similar challenges: live ensemble rehearsals are essentially impossible, and the pandemic has forced us to indefinitely postpone nearly all in-person performances. The resultant loss of certain social elements of music education – the exhilaration of live performance and the friendships formed within student groups – risks waning student interest, potentially impacting enrollment. Despite these unforeseeable challenges, the strategy employed by the Basie’s Monmouth Conservatory of Music (a community music school founded in Red Bank, NJ in 1964) has enabled us to thrive throughout the pandemic: year-on-year enrollment increased by 11.3% during the spring semester and 76% for the summer term. This positive outcome is the result of the collaborative efforts of our teachers, administrative staff, parents, and funders. Our key strategy during COVID was to expand community engagement. We drastically increased free extracurricular virtual offerings, including weekly student and faculty recitals, free arts workshops, and even a Science of Sound workshop taught by an engineer from Johnson & Johnson. We’ve also discovered new opportunities in the virtual environment. In partnership with the University of Iowa, we launched a virtual internship program, which provides music majors with hands-on teaching experience, and tuition-free education opportunities for underrepresented students. Additionally, we have held international virtual masterclasses, attracting participants across six US states, Brazil, Mexico, and Canada. In the proposed presentation, I will discuss community building in the virtual environment, share strategies for community engagement (students, parents, faculty, and funders), as well as new collaborative opportunities for post-pandemic recovery.

Let’s Critically Create: Nurturing the 21st Century Skills for Social Change

Clinician: Sangmi Kang

Session Description

Participants in this session will be able to (a) recognize various existential and social problems demonstrated in musical pieces’ lyrics and cultural backgrounds (Green, 2009), (b) brainstorm possible steps for citizens to take for societal change (Hess, 2019), (c) create and present a musical outcome that suggests alternative views or solutions to the existential and social problems, (d) peer-review their musical outcomes using musical and critical-thinking criteria, and (e) extend the discussion to address the BLM movement in the music classroom using this critical creating approach (Abrahams, 2010). Sequence of Presentation Outline

  1. Prologue: How has the world changed and which skills are required to succeed in this new era? How can we address societal problems relevant to this contemporary world?
  2. Main Content
      Noble Duke of York (British Folk Song) – elementary example

      1. Sing and dance with the song. Participants will engage in the partner folk dance.
      2. Understand the lyrics and cultural background of the song. In this song, the Noble Duke of York commands his thousand men to march up and down the street or catch a fox without a logical reason.
      3. Discuss how this song’s lyrics differ from the contemporary political structure. Does this political structure work in this contemporary world? Help participants learn about the background of the song in a reciprocal way in the small group discussion.
      4. Create and present alternative lyrics and dance moves that represent the current political system (such as representation of citizens, a voting system, decision-making, etc.)
      5. Present either the alternative lyrics with the same melody or arrangement of the song and peer-evaluate how the musical flow corresponds with the new lyrics and dance moves.
    1. Verdi’s Opera Rigolleto, La donna e mobile – secondary example
      1. Sing the entirety of the song.
      2. Understand the lyrics and cultural background of the opera and this aria (the main character’s treatment of women) from the perspective of critical gender theory.
      3. Discuss whether participants can still find such treatment of females in this contemporary world. Participants will engage in a reciprocal discussion in a small group.
      4. Create and present alternative lyrics and dance moves from the critical gender theory.
      5. Present either the alternative lyrics with the same melody or arrangement of the song and peer-evaluate how the musical flow corresponds with the new lyrics and dance moves.
  3. Brainstorm how this approach can address the BLM (Black Lives Matter) movement. Review the origin of American folk songs and discuss appropriate pedagogical approaches.

Activities in this session are suitable for 3rd to 8th grade students. Depending on student interest, willingness, and musical readiness, we can locate multiple standards in each step of the project-based activity.

  1. Performing
    • MU:PR6.1.4a Perform music, alone or with others, with expression and technical accuracy, and appropriate interpretation.
    • Participants will engage in performing activities to musically and cognitively understand the original form of music.
  2. Responding (Connecting)
    • MU:RE7.1.5a Demonstrate and explain, citing evidence, how selected music connects to and is influenced by specific interests, experiences, purposes, or contexts. MU:CN11.0.5a Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.
    • Afterwards, in a group discussion, participants will explore the context of the music (such as social, cultural, and historical) and discuss how it informs performance practices. To make relevant connections between the background of the song and the current societal structure, participants should bring prior knowledge and experience to the discussion.
  3. Creating and Presenting
    • MU:Cr2.1.5a: Demonstrate selected and develop ed musical ideas for improvisations, arrangements, or compositions to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and context. MU:Cr3.2.5a Present the final version of created music for others that demonstrates craftsmanship, and explain connection to expressive intent.
    • With musical repertoire relevant to various existential and social questions, participants will critically create musical outcomes demonstrating their problem-solving skills. Their creating may include but is not limited to songwriting, creating choreography, adding accompaniments, or arrangements. The new created versions will be presented.
  4. Peer-Evaluating
      MU:Cr3.2.4a: Evaluate, refine, and document revisions to personal music, applying teacher-provided and collaboratively developed criteria and feedback to show improvement over time.

After presenting the piece, participants will engage in peer-evaluation discussion by addressing the arranged versions’ musical and social meanings. Participants can develop the assessment criteria together.

True Colors: Score Study and Marking the Music with Color

Clinician: Dr. Eric Posada

Session Description

The process of score study is necessary and subjective. It should also be tedious and meticulous. Though all directors have faced differing levels of fear looking upon a new, unknown score, most follow their tried and true formula or process. Depending on the complexity of the score, one may feel disoriented and wonder where and how to begin. Regardless of the preparatory steps taken and hours spent prior to the first rehearsal, marking the score is crucial. This ensures the director will recall all the salient aspects of the study period and convey them successfully to the students. Coloring the score will not only enhance the score but also make it more manageable and resourceful. In turn, this will lead to efficiency in the classroom. For this session, I will use four choral scores, with varying degrees of difficulty, to demonstrate my methodology in coloring the score and provide attendees with numerous options to do the same. The primary objective is for these choral directors to feel empowered to return home and experiment with their own academic, religious, or communal scores. It is only via trial and error that they will discover the score’s true colors. Once this occurs, directors will not want to conduct a score without marking and coloring it beforehand. From dynamics and musicality to instrumental doubling, form, and cues, coloring is a fun and helpful tool all choral directors should own.

Grad School: Do I Go and How Will I Know?

Clinician: Daniel Farr
Co-Presenter: Alexander Gonzalez

Session Description

Presenters provide insight into the graduate school experience. Topics will include timing, process, areas of study, benefits, and drawbacks. Graduate coursework is tied to what you will do once the experience is complete. Whether you will continue teaching at your current school, seek work in a new position, or pivot into higher education, this interactive conversation will offer perspectives on what your graduate school experience can look like. The session will conclude with an open forum for attendees to pose questions and share experiences.

Demystifying the Sight-Reading Process

Clinician: Timothy Kaiser

Session Description

Although mastery of sight-reading skills is an essential component of musicianship, our band, orchestra, and choir students are often intimidated by the prospect of sight-reading. This presentation will outline a year-long approach to teaching sight-reading fundamentals, including strategies for incorporating sight-reading practice into the daily rehearsal plan. Whether you are preparing for an adjudicated contest or simply looking to build a basic skill set, a focus on sight-reading will yield accomplished, independent musicians capable of performing a wide variety of repertoire.